Posts Tagged ‘Fleet driver training’

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One of Britain’s most iconic publications is undergoing a digital revolution today as Transport Secretary, Justine Greening, marks the Highway Code’s 81st year by launching it as an interactive app for smartphones.

The best-seller’s technological transformation will make it even easier for road users to keep up to date with the rules of the road.

Much of the Highway Code’s content has changed considerably since its launch in 1931. For example mirrors were not even mentioned in the first edition and drivers were advised to sound their horn when overtaking.

It is already free to read online, can be downloaded as an ebook and there are also Facebook and Twitter accounts offering regular topical reminders.

Now a new app for the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch will make it even easier to keep up to date with the rules of the road through a more intuitive, interactive format.

It includes the complete contents of the Highway Code with a search facility making it easy to find rules and information. There are also interactive features like quizzes, a stopping distance calculator and a tool to help users identify road signs.

The Official Highway Code app is available on iTunes.

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Story from Fleet News

Fleet operators have been warned that police forces across the UK are waiting to convict one of them under corporate manslaughter and corporate homicide legislation.

The message was delivered to fleet decision-makers attending this year’sMercedes-Benz sponsored ACFO Conference and AGM by Sgt Gareth Morgan, supervisor of South Wales Police Driver Training.

To date there have been just two successful prosecutions under the 2007 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act, but neither were linked to fatalities involving at-work drivers.

Historically police forces investigated ‘death on the highway’. However, they now look for ‘responsibility’, which in the case of at-work drivers could include investigation of the roles played by fleet decision-makers, company directors and other employees in implementing and managing an occupational road risk management strategy.

’90% of accidents are as a result of human behaviour,’ said Sgt Morgan, who advocates businesses using psychometric profiling as a successful method to enable drivers to self-evaluate their behaviour on the road and organisations to develop and implement at-work driving risk management strategies.

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As expected, the Queen’s Speech included plans for legislation to make drug driving a specific offence – but the IAM and ABD have both urged that the new law is used to detect impairment rather than simply prosecute drug users. Currently police have to show that driving had been impaired by drugs in order to prosecute, but under the new law it will automatically be an offence to drive with certain controlled drugs in your body in excess of specified limits. The government believes the law change will make it easier to prosecute. The proposed law is to be included in the Crime, Communications and Court Bill. Offenders could face a jail term and fine of up to £5,000 as well as an automatic driving ban of at least 12 months. Police will use a hand-held drug detection devices, which will take a saliva sample, as well as a breathalyser. The Home Office is expected to approve the devices by the end of this year. The exact drugs covered by the offence and the specified limits for each will be decided following advice from the expert panel and public consultation. David Cameron, prime minister, said: “We want to do for drug-driving what drink-driving laws have done for driving under the influence of alcohol. That’s why we’re doing what we can to get drugalysers rolled out more quickly.” Mike Penning, road safety minister, said: “Drug-drivers are a deadly menace – they must be stopped and that is exactly what I intend to do. The new offence sends out a clear message that if you drive whilst under the influence of drugs you will not get away with it. This measure will help to rid our roads of the irresponsible minority who would risk the lives of innocent motorists and pedestrians.”

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It  has been reported on the national BBC News that,

Drug-driving is set to become a specific offence in England and Wales, with a potential jail term and fine, under a new law expected in the Queen’s Speech

Currently police have to show that driving had been impaired by drugs in order to prosecute, but under the new law it will automatically be an offence to drive with certain controlled drugs in your body in excess of specified limits.  The government believes the law change will make it easier to prosecute.

The proposed law is to be included in the Crime, Communications and Court Bill. Offenders could face a jail term and fine of up to £5,000 as well as an automatic driving ban of at least 12 months.

Police will use a hand-held drug detection devices, which will take a saliva sample, as well as a breathalyser. The Home Office is expected to approve the devices by the end of this year. The exact drugs covered by the offence and the specified limits for each will be decided following advice from the expert panel and public consultation.

David Cameron, prime minister, said: “We want to do for drug-driving what drink-driving laws have done for driving under the influence of alcohol.

“That’s why we’re doing what we can to get drugalysers rolled out more quickly.”

Mike Penning, road safety minister, said: “Drug-drivers are a deadly menace – they must be stopped and that is exactly what I intend to do. The new offence sends out a clear message that if you drive whilst under the influence of drugs you will not get away with it.

“This measure will help to rid our roads of the irresponsible minority who would risk the lives of innocent motorists and pedestrians.”

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Company car drivers go slow to save fuel

The importance of fuel efficiency is is becoming a greater concern to all drivers but more importantly to business users a  recent survey found, almost two out of three company car users drive slower as a result of high fuel prices, while a fifth actively try to limit their mileage. According to ALD Automotive, of the 1000 UK business drivers surveyed, 50% shop around for the cheapest fuel available, 65% drive slower and more smoothly in an effort to save fuel and 20% drive fewer miles.

‘It‘s no surprise that drivers are taking additional steps to save fuel, whether it be through shopping around for the cheapest price, or changing their driving behavior can play in helping reduce fuel consumption.’ The average UK fuel price is at a record high of £142.42/litre for petrol and £147.84/litre for diesel.

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DSA is making changes to the independent driving.  Examiners will no longer be showing the candidate a map  when giving direction instructions.  If the candidate wants to see the map they should ask the examiner to see it.
Any Comments from learner drivers from Bury  and Bolton ?

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The new online driver enquiry service, developed by DSA, has just been launched to allow lorry, bus and coach drivers working towards Driver CPC to go online to check records of the periodic training they’ve done.

Lorry, bus and coach drivers can access the service 24 hours a day, which provides a clear and simple online record, showing:

  • the driver’s Driver CPC qualification expiry date (bus and coach and / or lorry)
  • details of each training course completed

Drivers can register to use the service at direct.gov.uk/checkdrivercpc

Benefits

The service also allows drivers to give current or prospective employers temporary access to their training records – allowing them to confirm how much periodic training the driver has completed in their five year cycle.

This online service should also benefit trainers by reducing the need for them to respond to individual driver and operator enquiries.

Uploading training records

It should only take up to five days from course completion for a driver’s training record to be updated.

If you’re a trainer, it’s important to get records added within this period.

If you’re a driver and your record hasn’t been updated within this time, you should contact your trainer directly. If you don’t get a satisfactory response from them, you should then raise this with DSA viadcpc.complaints@dsa.gsi.gov.uk

Linking to the service

If you’re a trainer or employer and want to add a button to your website that links to this service, you can do so using the attached graphic.

You can also add the following message to the training certificate you issue at the end of your training course – helping to raise awareness of the service:

Link button for enquiry service
“Check your periodic training has been recorded atdirect.gov.uk/checkdrivercpc

 

Mobile Phones Ban

Apr
2012
20

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3M Case Study Mobile Phones

Since introducing a ban on the use of mobile phones whilst driving, 3M has monitored employees’ attitudes on an annual basis.

A survey conducted three months after the ban was introduced indicated a swing in employees’ attitude. When the ban was first introduced, 56 per cent of staff did not welcome it. Just three months later, less than half (41 per cent) said they did not like it. By June 2011 negative sentiment stood at 35 per cent.

The most recent survey (which was anonymous) showed 49 per cent of employees complying with the policy fully; 46 per cent ‘most of the time’ and 5 per cent ignoring it. The results showed real signs that the safety message was getting through. When asked their reasons for complying with the new rules, 6 per cent said it was because they thought using a mobile phone while driving was a dangerous distraction and could lead to an accident.

The survey also indicated that the ban had tracked through to 3M employees’ personal lives. 43 per cent said that they already avoided using their personal phone while driving – but since the work ban a further 48 per cent had either stopped or reduced the practice

I think more companies who adopt this approach is only going improve road safety but also improve their public image which is the best form of advertisement, any companies needing any  advice concerning  training for their drivers please contact Heathcote Driver Training of Bury.

 

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The Guardian promotes International Road Safety

In partnership with the Road Safety Fund, The Guardian will feature a new road safety section within its Global Development website. The ‘development and road safety’ site will focus on providing compelling reporting, discussion and debate on the growing global road deaths epidemic.

The Guardian’s Global Development website will feature news articles, comment and analysis content, multimedia, data reporting and social media coverage.

A key aim of the website is to help sustain momentum for action to improve global road safety by holding governments, international institutions, the donor community, NGOs and the private sector to account for the implementation of the Decade of Action for Road Safety.

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A recent survey concerning road markings around The UK’s states that the road markings are vanishing at an alarming rate, with well over half of white lines in Scotland and Wales almost non-existent, and England’s road markings faring little better.

snapshot survey of nearly 500 miles conducted by The Road Safety Markings Association shows that, on average, 50.6 percent of the UK’s road markings surveyed are barely visible. The proportion of roads falling into the “emergency repairs” bracket stands at 23 per cent; while less than 7 per cent of road markings score the highest rating.

By contrast, a survey carried out 12 months earlier on the UK’s 10 most dangerous roads showed that 23 percent of centre lines fell into the lowest category while 31 percent qualified for the highest rating.

I know lots of roads around Bury and Bolton which I have reported to the local authorities, if you know any make sure you report them, could help to reduce road casualties.

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